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INTRODUCING THE 1836 DRYER

by Liberty Star Equipment

Natural Groomer is proud to represent Liberty Star Equipment and offer the opportunity to purchase their newest Dryer!

 

The  1836 model includes:

Dual Motors that are individually switched, easy filter change and a crush proof hose

READ MORE >>

 

 

NEW PRODUCT

Natural Groomer is proud to introduce it's newest product, an all natural Ear Cleaner.

 

Specially formulated with Tree Tree Oil and Eucalyptus Oil for anti-fungal and anti-bacterial action, Peppermint Oil for soothing of ear pain, Witch Hazel for inflammation, and alcohol for dissolving wax, cleaning dirt and drying any moisture in the ear.

This product is used straight from the bottle, applying drops to each ear and gently massaging to loosen dirt and dissolve ear wax, then gently swab out with cotton or wipe with cloth.

 

Groomers check your order page for a Special Introductory Rate for your first time purchase.

HELPFUL TIDBITS FROM AROUND THE WEB

COLD WEATHER

Brrrr—it's cold outside!  The following guidelines will help you protect your companion animals when the mercury dips.

 

Keep your cat inside. Outdoors, felines can freeze, become lost or be stolen, injured or killed. Cats who are allowed to stray are exposed to infectious diseases, including rabies, from other cats, dogs and wildlife.

 

During the winter, outdoor cats sometimes sleep under the hoods of cars. When the motor is started, the cat can be injured or killed by the fan belt. If there are outdoor cats in your area, bang loudly on the car hood before starting the engine to give the cat a chance to escape.

 

Never let your dog off the leash on snow or ice, especially during a snowstorm, dogs can easily become lost. Make sure your dog always wears ID tags.

 

Thoroughly wipe off your dog's legs and stomach when he comes in out of the sleet, snow or ice. He can ingest salt, antifreeze or other potentially dangerous chemicals while licking his paws, and his paw pads may also bleed from snow or encrusted ice.

 

Never shave your dog down to the skin in winter, as a longer coat will provide more warmth. When you bathe your dog in the colder months, be sure to completely dry him before taking him out for a walk. Own a short-haired breed? Consider getting him a coat or sweater with a high collar or turtleneck with coverage from the base of the tail to the belly. For many dogs, this is regulation winter wear.

Never leave your dog or cat alone in a car during cold weather. A car can act as a refrigerator in the winter, holding in the cold and causing the animal to freeze to death.

 

Puppies do not tolerate the cold as well as adult dogs, and may be difficult to housebreak during the winter. If your puppy appears to be sensitive to the weather, you may opt to paper-train him inside. If your dog is sensitive to the cold due to age, illness or breed type, take him outdoors only to relieve himself.

 

Does your dog spend a lot of time engaged in outdoor activities? Increase his supply of food, particularly protein, to keep him, and his fur, in tip-top shape.

 

Like coolant, antifreeze is a lethal poison for dogs and cats. Be sure to thoroughly clean up any spills from your vehicle, and consider using products that contain propylene glycol rather than ethylene glycol. Visit the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center more information.

 

Make sure your companion animal has a warm place to sleep, off the floor and away from all drafts. A cozy dog or cat bed with a warm blanket or pillow is perfect.

DOGS LEAST LIKELY TO BE ADOPTED

Black Dogs

 

Large black dogs have a harder time being placed than most dogs, no matter their breed. People are often intimidated by them and overlook them as potential companions. It could be that in movies and the media, it is always large menacing black dogs that depict evil. Or perhaps it is that they are difficult to read and hard to photograph well. They just don’t get good PR. Many shelters say that big black dogs are more likely to be euthanized than to find a home. There is also an overabundance of them in shelter situations. So if you are looking for your next best friend, maybe take a closer look at a black dog who needs a good home.

Over-represented Breeds

 

Pitbulls and Chihuahuas are the two most common breeds found in shelters and because there are so many of them it is difficult to find them all homes. Neither of these breeds inherently has behavior problems, but like any dog they can be difficult to manage. Chihuahuas are high-energy dogs in a tiny package. So they are not for everyone and can also live well into their teens. If you love travel-sized dogs with a whole lot of energy, you don’t have to look any further than your local shelter. There are also more pitbulls in shelters than homes for them. As a large and powerful breed, not every home is suitable for these sweet and fun-loving dogs.

PRACTICE BASIC SUMMER SAFETY

 

NEVER LEAVE YOUR PETS IN A PARKED CAR

Not even for a minute. Not even with the car running and air conditioner on. On a warm day, temperatures inside a vehicle can rise rapidly to dangerous levels. On an 85-degree day, for example, the temperature inside a car with the windows opened slightly can reach 102 degrees within 10 minutes. After 30 minutes, the temperature will reach 120 degrees. Your pet may suffer irreversible organ damage or die.

 

WATCH THE HUMIDITY

"It's important to remember that it's not just the ambient temperature but also the humidity that can affect your pet," says Dr. Barry Kellogg, VMD, of the Humane Society Veterinary Medical Association. "Animals pant to evaporate moisture from their lungs, which takes heat away from their body. If the humidity is too high, they are unable to cool themselves, and their temperature will skyrocket to dangerous levels—very quickly."

 

Taking a dog's temperature will quickly tell you if there is a serious problem. Dogs' temperatures should not be allowed to get over 104 degrees. If your dog's temperature does, follow the instructions for treating heat stroke.

 

LIMIT EXERCISE ON HOT DAYS

Take care when exercising your pet. Adjust intensity and duration of exercise in accordance with the temperature. On very hot days, limit exercise to early morning or evening hours, and be especially careful with pets with white-colored ears, who are more susceptible to skin cancer, and short-nosed pets, who typically have difficulty breathing. Asphalt gets very hot and can burn your pet's paws, so walk your dog on the grass if possible. Always carry water with you to keep your dog from dehydrating.

 

DON'T RELY ON A FAN

Pets respond differently to heat than humans do. (Dogs, for instance, sweat primarily through their feet.) And fans don't cool off pets as effectively as they do people.

 

PROVIDE AMPLE SHADE AND WATER

Any time your pet is outside, make sure he or she has protection from heat and sun and plenty of fresh, cold water. In heat waves, add ice to water when possible. Tree shade and tarps are ideal because they don't obstruct air flow. A doghouse does not provide relief from heat—in fact, it makes it worse.

 

COOL YOUR PET INSIDE AND OUT

Whip up a batch of quick and easy DIY peanut butter popsicles for dogs. (You can use peanut butter or another favorite food.) And always provide water, whether your pets are inside or out with you.

 

Keep your pet from overheating indoors or out with a cooling body wrap, vest, or mat (such as the Keep Cool Mat). Soak these products in cool water, and they'll stay cool (but usually dry) for up to three days. If your dog doesn't find baths stressful, see if she enjoys a cooling soak.

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